Valentine’s heart fizzy painting

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Valentine's heart fizzy painting: A combined art and science project for preschoolers || Gift of Curiosity

This activity was inspired by a post at Toddler Approved, where they used baking soda and vinegar to make a fizzy pumpkin project. We decided to use the same concept to make fizzy Valentine’s hearts!

To do this activity, I had to prepare the fizzy paint. I decided to stick with just four, Valentine’s-inspired paint colors: red, purple, blue, and white. For each color, I mixed 1 TBS of paint with 3 TBS of baking soda in our no-spill paint cups.

Then I prepared a cup with vinegar, to which I added some plastic pipettes for the kids to use for suctioning. (Using the pipettes not only helps them to use a reasonable amount of vinegar, it also builds fine motor skills.)

Valentine's heart fizzy painting: A combined art and science project for preschoolers || Gift of Curiosity

I also prepared a craft tray with a paper heart for each kid.

Valentine's heart fizzy painting: A combined art and science project for preschoolers || Gift of Curiosity

And QBoy and XGirl had plenty of painting brushes to choose from.

Valentine's heart fizzy painting: A combined art and science project for preschoolers || Gift of Curiosity

Initially, QBoy and XGirl just thought it was a painting activity, and they happily began applying color to their Valentine’s hearts.

Valentine's heart fizzy painting: A combined art and science project for preschoolers || Gift of Curiosity

Valentine's heart fizzy painting: A combined art and science project for preschoolers || Gift of Curiosity

After a while of normal painting, both kids decided to try painting with two brushes at a time.

Valentine's heart fizzy painting: A combined art and science project for preschoolers || Gift of Curiosity

Valentine's heart fizzy painting: A combined art and science project for preschoolers || Gift of Curiosity

Once they had done plenty of painting, I brought out the vinegar and pipettes. Since we had used the pipettes before, the kids knew how to use them, but they were not expecting the paint to start bubbling and fizzing.

Valentine's heart fizzy painting: A combined art and science project for preschoolers || Gift of Curiosity

The oohed and ahhed to watch the reaction between the baking soda in the paint and the vinegar in their pipettes.

Valentine's heart fizzy painting: A combined art and science project for preschoolers || Gift of Curiosity

They kept adding more and more vinegar in order to make their paint fizzle again and again.

Valentine's heart fizzy painting: A combined art and science project for preschoolers || Gift of Curiosity

Valentine's heart fizzy painting: A combined art and science project for preschoolers || Gift of Curiosity

This activity was a big hit with the kids, which I know because they asked to do it again right away. 🙂

More Valentine’s Day learning resources


For more Valentine ideas, check out my Valentine Activities for Kids page and my Valentine’s Pinterest board.

Follow Katie @ Gift of Curiosity’s board Valentine’s Day on Pinterest.

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Comments

  1. Pat says

    Sorry I missed this for Valentines, but will have my class do this with shades of green for shamrocks for St. Patricks. Combo of art and science…thanks.

  2. Courtney says

    I love this, but am I doing the ingredients correctly? 1 tablespoon of paint and 3 tablespoons of baking powder???? I can’t get the paint to soak in all that powder???

    • says

      Yep, that’s the ratio we used. But if the paint isn’t soaking in, just add more paint, maybe in a 1:2 ratio instead of a 1:3 ratio. You will still get a fizzy effect even if you change it up a bit!

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